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Impulse 1-2013-EN

page 4 | impulse | 1/2013 A close look at hygiene in dental practices What dentists should observe when processing work clothing While gloves and masks used in dental practices have to be ‘Over 70 % of all people disposed of after every patient, wearing dentures carry clothing is often not washed a fungal infection with until the end of the day and the oral thrush organism then usually only in a normal Candida albicans which household washing machine. But causes uncomfortable which germs are lurking on the tunics after a day’s work and how inflammations in the can these be reliably restored to mouth and throat area.’ a hygienically sound condition? The germs feared by dentists Yeast fungi, for example, adhere include viruses (HIV, hepatitis B particularly well to the polyacrylic and C, herpes) as well as bacteria material of the dentures and settle such as tuberculosis pathogens there very easily, allowing the or staphylococci. Fungi are often pathogens to spread to the employees’ underestimated, even though they clothing through small drops are a much more common problem: transferred during dental treatments, e.g. when drilling or rinsing. detergent with bleaching agents and regular intervals. The microbiological A study by the Hohenstein Insti- hygiene conditioner) have to be used laboratory of the Hohenstein Institute tute has examined the hygienic per- in sufficient quantities. subsequently determines whether formance of different household wa- the test pathogens were reliably shing procedures. The result: From a destroyed. This method has already ‘Dental practices and hygiene point of view there are fun- proven successful in monitoring patients are on the safe damentally no objections to washing hygiene in commercial laundries for the work clothing in a household ma- side if they additionally many years. The successful self-tests chine. This sometimes results in re- check the efficiency of can, for example, be attached to the contamination on the washed items, the washing procedure at mandatory hygiene plan and displayed though, caused by old (pathogen) re- regular intervals.’ in the practice to demonstrate the sidue in the machine. efficiency of the hygiene measures So what should dentists take into towards authorities and patients. account for washing? It is especially important to actually reach water The Hohenstein experts have temperatures of at least 60°C and to developed special germ-bearing Dr. Anja Gerhardts Pathogens can be transferred from the patient to the clothing of the practice's employees a.gerhardts@hohenstein.decloths for self checks. Thesecheck this regularly, particularly with older machines. In addition, suitable bioindicators loaded with bacteria through the air, particularly during drilling and rinsing. The transmission risk is especially high here as these items are not changed after every patient. washing additives (powdered full or fungi are added to the laundry at www.hohenstein.de/pr-462-EN Higher turnover at point of sale (POS) Neuromarketing as a key to targeted sales Neuromarketing is a decision making phase during with the consumer. crucial emotional quality experience relatively young research which subconscious perceptions In consultation with the clients of clothing at the point of sale (POS). field of neurosciences. through eyes, hands and sense of from industry and commerce the These data can also be used to It combines findings smell determine whether any further scientists use e.g. defined target positively influence customers’ from medicine, economy interest for a product is generated groups (test buyers) to evaluate the sensory functions during the sale. and psychology and uses these to explain customers’ decision making processes. A multifunctional sensory laboratory at the Hohenstein Institute makes So-called neuromarketing examines the in- these findings available for use by fluence of sensory perceptions on buying textile companies for the first time. decisions. I t u s e s m e t h o d s o f psychophysiology to record visual, For pilot studies, the project team are tactile and olfactory textile stimuli looking for interested companies who directly on the customer. The would like to evaluate their products at POS using neuromarketing, ‘With these psychophysiological data, allowing them to positively influence subconscious customer requests can already be the sale. taken into account during the development of textile products.’ Dr. Timo Hammer t.hammer@hohenstein.de experts then correlate these sensory www.hohenstein.de/pr-461-EN stimuli with the subconscious buying decisions. The main focus is on the Our five senses (see, hear, touch, smell, taste) provide us with an abundance of information every second. We register only a fraction of short time span of the intuitive them, but the body still reacts. This multisensory information can be used at the POS.


Impulse 1-2013-EN
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